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Find out when the last reboot occurred (Updated)

by Steve Wiseman on July 21, 2008 · 10 comments

in Windows


.

I have been playing around with the SystemInfo command in windows, and I wanted a concise way to see what the uptime of my system was.

It is actually very simple. Get a command line, and type:

Windows System Uptime

It will go through some calculations, and finally come back:

Windows System Uptime Output

This is a very simple way to see if that server, or workstation was really rebooted.

Note: It seems that I have been caught using Windows XP again. Can’t help it…so much faster than my Vista box. The above command will not work for 2008, or Vista. This is because Microsoft has changed the output of SystemInfo. To get very similar info for those two operating systems you can use: “systeminfo | find “System Boot Time”

Update #2: On Windows 2003 it is different too: “systeminfo | find “System Up Time”

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{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Madi Fox April 6, 2009 at 4:16 am

I’ve tried the Update #2 on windows 2003, dont seem to work though. The commands runs and then returns a command prompt. I’ve piped the output to a text file and there’s nothing in it.

2 Madi Fox April 6, 2009 at 11:35 am

Ah! the caps must be exact. working great!

3 Benson Varghese November 3, 2009 at 4:08 am

Why you want make such complicate … just type simple command uptime gives you the result.

C:\>uptime
\\xxxxxxxxxxx has been up for: 4 day(s), 21 hour(s), 6 minute(s), 19 second(s)

4 AnonymousCoward February 16, 2010 at 2:17 pm

“uptime” is a separate app which must be installed, it doesn’t exist by default. the “sysinfo” command does exist by default on 2003.

5 Helpful stranger August 13, 2010 at 12:01 pm

Note #2 is not needed, Up Time is a sub-string, so it is found.
Thanks for the tip!

6 Niklas March 14, 2012 at 4:49 am

Great – thanks! :-)

7 Len Biggertaff July 14, 2012 at 9:16 am

I needed to modify this to:
systeminfo | find “Boot Time”

8 Lesimplesmente August 6, 2012 at 6:12 pm

the correct is systeminfo | find “System Boot Time”
it’s working.

9 Jeremy Dyde May 1, 2014 at 4:13 pm

Am using it on 8.1 and result is incorrect. It is showing a time of 01:30 on 28th and the machine was powered off on the morning of 29th due to electricity outage until midday and then rebooted at least twice after that.

10 Steve Wiseman May 2, 2014 at 12:16 am

Not much we can do about that right? It is a MS command. What happens when you just call SystemInfo.exe by itself? Does it show the proper time?

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